What is Silica Gel?

What is Silica Gel? Silica gel is a granular, vitreous, porous form of silicon dioxide made synthetically from sodium silicate. Silica gel contains a nano-porous silica micro-structure, suspended inside a liquid. Most applications of silica gel require it to be dried, in which case it is called silica xerogel. For practical purposes, silica gel is often interchangeable with silica xerogel. Silica xerogel is tough and hard; it is […]

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I Found the Answer

I Found the Answer Finally, I found what this is: I cracked one of the tiny stones and the inside was black: I guess the color has been covered by some other minerals or the color on the outside has been changed from weathering. Remember, the color of magnetite is always black. Also, I did the streak test. The “streak test” […]

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How to get rid of flies in your house

From Indianes Kitchen. Go visit the link on the bottom of this post. It will tell you how. Don’t you hate that time of the year when the Fruit Flies invade your kitchen? Landing on your food is disgusting! It seems like they are everywhere and you can’t get rid of them! You won’t get rid of them completely unless you throw out your ripe produce or put the ripe produce in the […] Visit the full post here: Fruit Fly Solution — In Dianes Kitchen

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Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work)

Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work) The last time we melted sulfur, and it was really fun (except for cleaning the test tube). Now let’s melt something else, what about Copper Sulfate? Copper (II) sulfate is the inorganic compound with the chemical formula CuSO4. Older names for this compound include blue vitriol, bluestone, vitriol of copper, and Roman vitriol. The pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O), the most commonly encountered salt, is bright blue. Melting Point: 110 °C (230 °F) Sulfur’s melting point is 5 °C higher (which means they’ll melt about the same time). It looks impossible to melt it because the sulfur is more (soft) like a powder, but this one is tiny crystals. Let’s give it a try anyway. Light the lamp! OK, it’s heating it up nicely. A couple minutes later: The copper sulfate is turning whiter, but still, all of it still remains solid. But look. There’s water vapor in there. That’s weird, maybe there’s too much heat? But the sulfate didn’t melt yet. 10 minutes later: The sulfur melted already at this time. But the sulfate still remains a solid and it’s just turning whiter. 20 minutes later: This is taking forever! It’s not melting. Did I do something wrong? It’s 115 °C already, and the temperature can go further. I guess it won’t melt anymore so I turned off the heat. Wow! this experiment is a fail. I wonder why it has water vapors? Why is it turning white? When is it actually going to turn to liquid? Any ideas why it didn’t […]

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Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin)

Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin) I’m going to be melting sulfur… Sulfur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16. It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic. Under normal conditions, sulfur atoms form cyclic octatomic molecules with a chemical formula S8. Elemental sulfur is a bright yellow crystalline solid at room temperature. Sulfur Melting Point: 115 °C ( 239.38 °F) Yay! the sulfur is melting! It took about 10 minutes to melt the sulfur. Now time to pour it into the mold! OK, the sulfur hardened. Time to take it out the mold. I used a hammer to take it out. No! that’s the ugly side. The better side is this:   Wow, I’m actually impressed. You’re probably wondering why the sulfur is brown. Just wait a couple days and the coin will turn yellow. But once it turned yellow, it has a chance to crumble in a month. Because sulfur crystallization is a complicated process. The time it takes is mostly determined by the temperatures the substance was subjected to initially. I’ll be making another post to show you how the color changed. Hope you enjoyed the experiment if you did, drop a like on the bottom ↓ Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur https://melscience.com/en/experiments/sulfur-melt/    

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Playing With Black Light

Playing With Black Light I was just looking around the internet for some cool stuff, and I found something that catches my eye. I found black light. A blacklight (or often black light), also referred to as a UV-A light, Wood’s lamp, or simply ultraviolet light, is a lamp that emits long-wave (UV-A) ultraviolet light and not much visible light.   One type of lamp has a violet filter material, either on the […]

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I Figured out why the Coins look Different

I Figured out why the Coins look Different Remember the coin experiment that I performed lately? When I washed the coins, they looked different. But why? I finally figured out the answer. Copper metal is oxidized by the Ag1+ to Cu2+ and the Ag1+ ions are reduced by the copper metal to silver metal. But do you remember what the coins are made of? Penny: The alloy remained 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc until 1982, when the composition was changed to 97.5 percent zinc and 2.5 percent copper (copper-plated zinc) until now. Cents of both compositions appeared in that year. 50 Satang (Thai baht): The core is 99% iron and cladding is 99% Copper. 10 Yen (Japanese Yen): 95% copper, 3–4% zinc, and 1–2% tin. The Penny turned yellow-orange because the zinc was mixed with copper. The Thai coin turned darker because of the iron. The Japanese coin turned yellow because of the zinc and tin. Tin is light yellow and zinc is gray. I hope you enjoyed that experiment, if you did, comment down below ↓ Sources: www.chem.indiana.edu/faculty…/5-5%20Silver%20Tree%20Redox%20Reaction.doc More sources at: The Silver Coin    

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Is this Iron or Magnetite?

Is this Iron or Magnetite? Today I wanted to identify this brown dust. I found the dust by me. I accidentally dropped a magnet on the ground and the dust sticks to the magnet. So I collected it to perform some experiments with it. So in this post, I’m going to identify this dust. Let’s perform some tests. This dust could […]

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