Do Water Vapors Effect the Mass of Copper (II) Sulfate?

Do Water Vapors Effect the Mass of Copper (II) Sulfate? The pentahydrate form, which is blue, is heated, turning the copper sulfate into the anhydrous form which is white, while the water that was present in the pentahydrate form evaporates. I wanted to know if water vapors affect the mass of copper sulfate. Things you’ll need: crucible, balance, Copper (II) Sulphate, spoon, alcohol lamp, […]

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Copper Plating: Part #1

Copper Plating: Part #1 I’ve never used a copper stick in one of my experiments, I found out that I’m good at plating, which is what we’re going to be doing in this post. You probably wondering why my copper is a green, it’s because of chemical reactions with the elements. Just as iron that is left unprotected in the […]

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Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work)

Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work) The last time we melted sulfur, and it was really fun (except for cleaning the test tube). Now let’s melt something else, what about Copper Sulfate? Copper (II) sulfate is the inorganic compound with the chemical formula CuSO4. Older names for this compound include blue vitriol, bluestone, vitriol of copper, and Roman vitriol. The pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O), the most commonly encountered salt, is bright blue. Melting Point: 110 °C (230 °F) Sulfur’s melting point is 5 °C higher (which means they’ll melt about the same time). It looks impossible to melt it because the sulfur is more (soft) like a powder, but this one is tiny crystals. Let’s give it a try anyway. Light the lamp! OK, it’s heating it up nicely. A couple minutes later: The copper sulfate is turning whiter, but still, all of it still remains solid. But look. There’s water vapor in there. That’s weird, maybe there’s too much heat? But the sulfate didn’t melt yet. 10 minutes later: The sulfur melted already at this time. But the sulfate still remains a solid and it’s just turning whiter. 20 minutes later: This is taking forever! It’s not melting. Did I do something wrong? It’s 115 °C already, and the temperature can go further. I guess it won’t melt anymore so I turned off the heat. Wow! this experiment is a fail. I wonder why it has water vapors? Why is it turning white? When is it actually going to turn to liquid? Any ideas why it didn’t […]

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Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin)

Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin) I’m going to be melting sulfur… Sulfur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16. It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic. Under normal conditions, sulfur atoms form cyclic octatomic molecules with a chemical formula S8. Elemental sulfur is a bright yellow crystalline solid at room temperature. Sulfur Melting Point: 115 °C ( 239.38 °F) Yay! the sulfur is melting! It took about 10 minutes to melt the sulfur. Now time to pour it into the mold! OK, the sulfur hardened. Time to take it out the mold. I used a hammer to take it out. No! that’s the ugly side. The better side is this:   Wow, I’m actually impressed. You’re probably wondering why the sulfur is brown. Just wait a couple days and the coin will turn yellow. But once it turned yellow, it has a chance to crumble in a month. Because sulfur crystallization is a complicated process. The time it takes is mostly determined by the temperatures the substance was subjected to initially. I’ll be making another post to show you how the color changed. Hope you enjoyed the experiment if you did, drop a like on the bottom ↓ Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sulfur https://melscience.com/en/experiments/sulfur-melt/    

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The Silver Coin

The Silver Coin What about this experiment? Remember the silver tree? That was a great experiment. Go over there and check it out (here: https://danupondrake.com/2017/06/25/the-silver-tree/). The silver nitrate will stick to the copper coil and make crystals. But instead of copper coils, why don’t we try copper coins? It will be fun to try! Let’s get started then! Let’s some […]

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