How to Calculate Molar Mass

How to Calculate Molar Mass Moles are a unit of measurement of chemicals. A mole is the atomic weight of a molecule of the chemical in grams and it is used very commonly in chemistry, so I’m going to show you how to calculate molar mass. You can find the molar mass right on the periodic table. On the table, there is the element symbol, the […]

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How to make Basic Copper Carbonate

How to make Basic Copper Carbonate Sometimes, I’m missing a couple of chemicals. The way to fix that problem is simply ordering them online, but I need it right now. So I decided to make my own chemicals by following procedures from the internet. For the first one, I’m going to be making basic copper carbonate (CuCo3). First, I added […]

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Making a Mercury Switch

Making a Mercury Switch Remember that experiment about mercury? I tried to show you that mercury can conduct electricity. And it did. I studied it a little bit more and I found this: A Simple (Tilt) Mercury Switch: It’s similar to the one we did the last time. Instead of tilting it around, what if you suck the mercury in […]

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Making Naphthalene Crystals

Making Naphthalene Crystals I realized that time passes so fast, it was about a week since I made a new post. I feel like it has been for only 3 days. Anyways, let’s get started with the post. I’ll try to make Naphthalene crystals. Naphthalene is a white crystalline solid with a characteristic odor. It’s melting point is about 80°C. […]

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Cleaning My Laboratory Sink

Cleaning My Laboratory Sink I think today is the time to clean my sink. I can’t have a dirty sink; If I have one, I’m going to turn into a sloppy chemist. Being clean and neat in life brings success to you (that just means being clean is good). Here’s my dirty sink, tons of stains in there. Before I […]

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Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction)

Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction) This simple experiment will make you understand the redox reaction. This is one of my favorite experiments so I decided to make a post about it. Things you’ll need: a copper coin (a penny, basically), zinc powder, sodium hydroxide (more than 50%), alcohol lamp, forceps, and a beaker. Pour Sodium Hydroxide into a beaker and pour some zinc dust in it, enough to cover the coin. Put the coin the beaker and wait for a couple hours, I’ll be using my country’s copper coin.   Take the coin out with forceps and wash it with water, now you have a silver coin. If you want to continue, do the following steps: Make sure the coin is dry. Heat it up with an alcohol lamp until it’s yellow. Enjoy. An oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction is a type of chemical reaction that involves a transfer of electrons between two chemicals. A redox reaction is any chemical reaction in which the oxidation number of a molecule, ion, or atom changes by losing or gaining an electron. For example, like this experiment, the zinc transferred its ions to the copper; that’s how the coin turned silver, and that’s why this is a redox reaction. What about turning it to gold? The color of silver and copper are just mixing together when heated and that makes the gold color.

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Do Water Vapors Effect the Mass of Copper (II) Sulfate?

Do Water Vapors Effect the Mass of Copper (II) Sulfate? The pentahydrate form, which is blue, is heated, turning the copper sulfate into the anhydrous form which is white, while the water that was present in the pentahydrate form evaporates. I wanted to know if water vapors affect the mass of copper sulfate. Things you’ll need: crucible, balance, Copper (II) Sulphate, spoon, alcohol lamp, […]

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Does Mercury Conduct Electricity?

Does Mercury Conduct Electricity? I bought this from my science shop yesterday so that I could perform more experiments. Why is it a liquid? The reason for mercury being a liquid is complex. It is heavy; a chunk of iron can float on mercury. Compared to other metals, it does not conduct heat well. However, it conducts electricity fairly well. Mercury is the only metal that is a liquid at normal […]

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