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Category: Chemistry

I can’t do Chemistry Experiments anymore

Ah, the good old days and my craze for science experiments. It was a fun time but I’m starting to lose motivation and I also don’t want to waste money. Since I’m moving to the U.S.A., I had to sell all of my supplies to someone else and if I move there, I’ll need to buy all of my supplies again. I cannot do this hobby because I’m just bored of it. You might be asking: “Dan, then what are going to post on this blog?” I’ll be posting about… Read more I can’t do Chemistry Experiments anymore

Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction)

Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction) This simple experiment will make you understand the redox reaction. This is one of my favorite experiments so I decided to make a post about it. Things you’ll need: a copper coin (a penny, basically), zinc powder, sodium hydroxide (more than 50%), alcohol lamp, forceps, and a beaker. Pour Sodium Hydroxide into a beaker and pour some zinc dust in it, enough to cover the coin. Put the coin the beaker and wait for a couple hours, I’ll be using… Read more Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction)

Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work)

Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work) The last time we melted sulfur, and it was really fun (except for cleaning the test tube). Now let’s melt something else, what about Copper Sulfate? Copper (II) sulfate is the inorganic compound with the chemical formula CuSO4. Older names for this compound include blue vitriol, bluestone, vitriol of copper, and Roman vitriol. The pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O), the most commonly encountered salt, is bright blue. Melting Point: 110 °C (230 °F) Sulfur’s melting point is 5 °C higher (which means they’ll melt about the same time). It looks impossible to melt it because the sulfur is more (soft) like a… Read more Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work)

Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin)

Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin) I’m going to be melting sulfur… Sulfur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16. It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic. Under normal conditions, sulfur atoms form cyclic octatomic molecules with a chemical formula S8. Elemental sulfur is a bright yellow crystalline solid at room temperature. Sulfur Melting Point: 115 °C ( 239.38 °F) Yay! the sulfur is melting! It took about 10 minutes to melt the sulfur. Now time to pour it into the mold! OK, the sulfur hardened. Time to take it out the mold. I used a hammer to take it out.… Read more Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin)

I Figured out why the Coins look Different

I Figured out why the Coins look Different Remember the coin experiment that I performed lately? When I washed the coins, they looked different. But why? I finally figured out the answer. Copper metal is oxidized by the Ag1+ to Cu2+ and the Ag1+ ions are reduced by the copper metal to silver metal. But do you remember what the coins are made of? Penny: The alloy remained 95 percent copper and 5 percent zinc until 1982, when the composition was changed to 97.5 percent zinc and 2.5 percent copper (copper-plated zinc) until now. Cents of both compositions appeared… Read more I Figured out why the Coins look Different