Chemistry Posts Page

  • I can’t do Chemistry Experiments anymore - Ah, the good old days and my craze for science experiments. It was a fun time but I’m starting to lose motivation and I also don’t want to waste money. Since I’m moving to the U.S.A., I had to sell all of my supplies to someone else and if I move there, I’ll need to …
  • Pouring Super Glue into Borax 1 - Pouring Super Glue into Borax 1 Everyone has heard about slime from school glue. But I was thinking what would happen if you use superglue instead of just regular school glue. Glue has long flexible molecules in it called polymers. These polymer molecules slide past each other as a liquid. Borax in water forms an …
  • How to Calculate Molar Mass - How to Calculate Molar Mass Moles are a unit of measurement of chemicals. A mole is the atomic weight of a molecule of the chemical in grams and it is used very commonly in chemistry, so I’m going to show you how to calculate molar mass. You can find the molar mass right on the periodic table. On the table, there …
  • How to make Basic Copper Carbonate - How to make Basic Copper Carbonate Sometimes, I’m missing a couple of chemicals. The way to fix that problem is simply ordering them online, but I need it right now. So I decided to make my own chemicals by following procedures from the internet. For the first one, I’m going to be making basic copper …
  • Revealing Fingerprints With Silver Nitrate - Revealing Fingerprints With Silver Nitrate Another Method from the same chemistry book. Weigh 0.3 grams of AgNO3. And pour it into 10ml of distilled water. I sprayed it and I shone it with an LED lamp (a UV lamp is better). Now I got this: I didn’t know why it was a line like that, but …
  • How to Reveal Fingerprints With Iodine Crystals - How to Reveal Fingerprints With Iodine Crystals Fingerprints on glass, metal, and other surfaces can be revealed by dusting them with powder. I tried it twice already but it was very hard, so I found this method in my chemistry book. Position the paper in the beaker like this: And put a gram of iodine crystals, …
  • Making a Mercury Switch - Making a Mercury Switch Remember that experiment about mercury? I tried to show you that mercury can conduct electricity. And it did. I studied it a little bit more and I found this: A Simple (Tilt) Mercury Switch: It’s similar to the one we did the last time. Instead of tilting it around, what if …
  • Making Naphthalene Crystals - Making Naphthalene Crystals I realized that time passes so fast, it was about a week since I made a new post. I feel like it has been for only 3 days. Anyways, let’s get started with the post. I’ll try to make Naphthalene crystals. Naphthalene is a white crystalline solid with a characteristic odor. It’s …
  • Cleaning My Laboratory Sink - Cleaning My Laboratory Sink I think today is the time to clean my sink. I can’t have a dirty sink; If I have one, I’m going to turn into a sloppy chemist. Being clean and neat in life brings success to you (that just means being clean is good). Here’s my dirty sink, tons of …
  • Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction) - Turning a Coin to Silver and Gold (Simple Redox Reaction) This simple experiment will make you understand the redox reaction. This is one of my favorite experiments so I decided to make a post about it. Things you’ll need: a copper coin (a penny, basically), zinc powder, sodium hydroxide (more than 50%), alcohol lamp, forceps, …
  • Do Water Vapors Effect the Mass of Copper (II) Sulfate? - Do Water Vapors Effect the Mass of Copper (II) Sulfate? The pentahydrate form, which is blue, is heated, turning the copper sulfate into the anhydrous form which is white, while the water that was present in the pentahydrate form evaporates. I wanted to know if water vapors affect the mass of copper sulfate. Things you’ll need: crucible, balance, Copper …
  • Does Mercury Conduct Electricity? - Does Mercury Conduct Electricity? I bought this from my science shop yesterday so that I could perform more experiments. Why is it a liquid? The reason for mercury being a liquid is complex. It is heavy; a chunk of iron can float on mercury. Compared to other metals, it does not conduct heat well. However, it conducts electricity fairly well. Mercury is the only metal that …
  • Copper Plating: Part #1 - Copper Plating: Part #1 I’ve never used a copper stick in one of my experiments, I found out that I’m good at plating, which is what we’re going to be doing in this post. You probably wondering why my copper is a green, it’s because of chemical reactions with the elements. Just as iron that …
  • Warm Chemistry - Warm Chemistry After that long break, I would like to do a very simple experiment to start. This one is pretty common, most people probably know this experiment, but no one realized that there was more to it. Things you’ll need: Yeast, hydrogen peroxide, a beaker, and a thermometer. Pour 200 ml of hydrogen peroxide …
  • What is Silica Gel? - What is Silica Gel? Silica gel is a granular, vitreous, porous form of silicon dioxide made synthetically from sodium silicate. Silica gel contains a nano-porous silica micro-structure, suspended inside a liquid. Most applications of silica gel require it to be dried, in which case it is called silica xerogel. For practical purposes, silica gel is often interchangeable with silica xerogel. Silica xerogel is …
  • Rehydrating Copper (II) Sulfate - Rehydrating Copper (II) Sulfate Someone gave me an idea and I want to do it: See what he said? Let’s follow him. The last time we used test tubes and destroyed all of them! So I’m going to use a beaker. I put the copper sulfate in it and going to burn it. It’s white …
  • Melting #4: Testing the Liquid - Melting #4: Testing the Liquid In the last time: I extracted water from Copper (II) Sulfate, and I would like to test it. What I would like to know is: can we drink it. Let’s find out. I didn’t use a rubber stopper to close the test tube because the new test tubes didn’t fit …
  • Melting #3: Liquid from Copper (II) Sulfate - Melting #3: Liquid from Copper (II) Sulfate Well, the last time, we tried to melt copper (II) sulfate, and it didn’t work at all. But there’s this water vapor from it: What I wanted to do today, is to extract the water out of it and test it. It loses two water molecules when heating …
  • I Found the Answer - I Found the Answer Finally, I found what this is: I cracked one of the tiny stones and the inside was black: I guess the color has been covered by some other minerals or the color on the outside has been changed from weathering. Remember, the color of magnetite is always black. Also, I did the …
  • What Happened to the Sulfur Coin? (Sulfur science and can the coin melt again?) - What Happened to the Sulfur Coin? (Sulfur science and can the coin melt again?) The coin: Now, what happened to that coin? It was 10 days since I made it, and I wanted to show you what happened. Here’s the coin: The coin has turned white and it came apart into a couple pieces… I …
  • Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work) - Melting #2: Copper (II) Sulfate (Didn’t Work) The last time we melted sulfur, and it was really fun (except for cleaning the test tube). Now let’s melt something else, what about Copper Sulfate? Copper (II) sulfate is the inorganic compound with the chemical formula CuSO4. Older names for this compound include blue vitriol, bluestone, vitriol of copper, and Roman vitriol. The pentahydrate (CuSO4·5H2O), the most commonly …
  • Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin) - Melting #1: Sulfur (Making a Sulfur Coin) I’m going to be melting sulfur… Sulfur is a chemical element with symbol S and atomic number 16. It is abundant, multivalent, and nonmetallic. Under normal conditions, sulfur atoms form cyclic octatomic molecules with a chemical formula S8. Elemental sulfur is a bright yellow crystalline solid at room temperature. Sulfur Melting Point: 115 °C ( 239.38 °F) Yay! the sulfur is melting! …
  • I Figured out why the Coins look Different - I Figured out why the Coins look Different Remember the coin experiment that I performed lately? When I washed the coins, they looked different. But why? I finally figured out the answer. Copper metal is oxidized by the Ag1+ to Cu2+ and the Ag1+ ions are reduced by the copper metal to silver metal. But …
  • Is this Iron or Magnetite? - Is this Iron or Magnetite? Today I wanted to identify this brown dust. I found the dust by me. I accidentally dropped a magnet on the ground and the dust sticks to the magnet. So I collected it to perform some experiments with it. So in this post, I’m going to identify this dust. Let’s perform …
  • The Silver Coin - The Silver Coin What about this experiment? Remember the silver tree? That was a great experiment. Go over there and check it out (here: https://danupondrake.wordpress.com/2017/06/25/the-silver-tree/). The silver nitrate will stick to the copper coil and make crystals. But instead of copper coils, why don’t we try copper coins? It will be fun to try! Let’s …
  • Golden Rain -  Golden Rain The silver tree was beautiful, now let’s perform a golden experiment.  This experiment kind of failed and pass. What I mean is that the experiment failed, and it was a success, you know what I mean. So don’t trust my steps, but be sure to follow the video at the end of this post. …
  • Color Change Chemistry 3 - Color Change Chemistry 3 On the second and first experiments, I used chemicals. But this time, I’m going to use grapes. Grapes contain a pigment molecule called flavin (an anthocyanin). This water-soluble pigment is also found in apple skin, plums, poppies, cornflowers, and red cabbage. Things you’ll need: Black grapes, alcohol lamp, beaker, water, test …
  • Separating Salt out of Water - Separating Salt out of Water Salt (NaCl) is a natural mineral made up of white cube-shaped crystals composed of two elements, sodium, and chlorine. It is translucent, colorless, odorless (officially, though we think you can smell the freshness of the sea in one of our boxes) and has a distinctive and characteristic taste. Salt occurs …
  • Elephant’s Toothpaste - Elephant’s toothpaste Today I’m going to do this common experiment that is used in chemistry classes called the elephant’s toothpaste. Elephant’s toothpaste is a foamy substance caused by the rapid decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. This is often used for classroom demonstrations because it requires only a small number of ingredients and makes a “volcano of foam”. Things you’ll need: …
  • The Silver Tree - The Silver Tree As said on my post (it finally came 2) the silver nitrate is only 10 grams and it’s about $20. 10 grams is a little amount and it is very expensive, so I hope I don’t make any mistakes. The classic silver tree demonstration! Very simple to set up and perform, it’s …
  • The Sediment of Lead (II) Nitrate - The Sediment of Lead (II) Nitrate Today, I’m going to do a common experiment about the sediment of Lead (II) Nitrate. This is a very quick demonstration showing that two solids can react together. White lead nitrate and white potassium iodide react to make yellow lead iodide. I added 5 grams of each chemical into 95ml  of water so I could have 5 % of …
  • Changing Iron to Copper - Changing Iron to Copper In this post, I’m going to show you how to change iron to copper in two easy steps.   Things you’ll need: copper (II) sulfate, a cup, a spoon, water, and nails or paper clips. Pour water into the cup. Put lots of copper sulfate into the cup. I put two …
  • Color Change Chemistry - Color Change Chemistry Change a clear liquid pink, then back to clear again in this impressive experiment. It may seem like magic, but it’s actually the science of PH. Things you’ll need: a beaker, a graduated cylinder, test tube holder, 3 test tubes, pipet, phenolphthalein, sodium carbonate, vinegar, and water. Fill the beaker halfway with …
  • Density Column - Density Column Let’s start off with an easy experiment today. Create a colorful column with three liquids stacked on top of each other inside a test tube. Things you’ll need: test tubes, pipet, food coloring, light or dark corn syrup, vegetable oil, and water. Pour about 3 ml of corn syrup into the test tube. …
  • How to make a Lava Lamp - How to make a Lava Lamp Well, you’re probably not interested in this post because you could just search the internet and find the same steps of this experiment. But the only thing good about this is that I will explain the science of this experiment. So let’s get started. Things you’ll need: a flask, …
  • Cold Chemistry - Cold Chemistry Endothermic chemical reaction use up heat energy, which means the end result is cool to the touch. Use Alka-Seltzer to see this reaction for yourself! Things you’ll need: A beaker, a thermometer, an Alka-Seltzer tablet, ice, and water. Fill the beaker with ice. Add enough water to cover the ice fully. Put the thermometer …
  • Slimes and States of Matter - How to make Slime in Three Steps (and states of matter) I’ll show you how to make slime in the easiest way. It’s going to be messy but it’s worth to try. Things you’ll need: Borax, water, a spoon, school glue, and two cups. Add one teaspoon of borax to 75ml of water into the …
  • Invisible ink - Invisible ink We know that phenolphthalein will turn pink if you drip 2-3 drops into a chemical that is base. That gave me an idea of how to make invisible ink. Things you’ll need: phenolphthalein solution, white paper, Q-tip, and ammonia-based glass cleaner (like Windex) Put a few drops of phenolphthalein onto a Q-tip. Use the …
  • What is Xylitol - What is Xylitol Xylitol is a sugar alcohol used as a sweetener. It has the formula CH2OH(CHOH)3CH2OH. Xylitol is categorized as polyalcohol or sugar alcohol, and it has some dental benefits in that it reduces cavities. One gram of xylitol contains 2.43 kilocalories (kcal), as compared to one gram of sugar, which has 3.87 kcal. …
  • Swirling Colors - Swirling Colors Can you make colors move in milk? Then perform this experiment. Things you’ll need: whole milk, a shallow dish, food coloring, and liquid dish soap. 1. Pour whole milk into the shallow dish.2. Let the milk warm up to room temperature. 3. Place drops of different food coloring in the milk. DO NOT STIR. …

 

%d bloggers like this: